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ATLAS Experiment CERN
ATLAS events
New view of a black hole event...
ATLAS events
New view of a black hole event...
ATLAS events
A black hole event...
ATLAS events
A black hole event...
ATLAS events
Simulated production of a black hole...
ATLAS events
Simulated production of a black hole...
ATLAS events
Simulated production of a black hole...
ATLAS events
Simulated production of a black hole...
ATLAS events
Simulated production of a black hole...
ATLAS events
Simulated production of a black hole...
ATLAS events
Simulated production of a black hole...
ATLAS events
Simulated production of a black hole...
ATLAS events
Simulated production of a black hole...
ATLAS events
Simulated production of a black hole...
ATLAS events
Simulated production of a black hole...
ATLAS events
Simulated production of a black hole...
ATLAS events
Simulated production of a black hole...
ATLAS events
Simulated production of a black hole...
ATLAS events
Simulated production of a black hole...
ATLAS events
Simulated production of a black hole...
ATLAS events
Simulated production of a black hole...
ATLAS events
Simulated production of a black hole...
ATLAS events
Simulated production of a black hole...
ATLAS events
Simulated production of a black hole...
ATLAS events
Sideview event pictures. A...
ATLAS events
Endview event picture. A...
ATLAS events
ATLAS collision event. In some...
ATLAS events
ATLAS collision event. In some...
Full Detector
"Black Hole" event superimposed...
 
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Simulated production of a black hole in ATLAS. This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in late 2009/2010. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was created in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.
Photo #: 0803019_01
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Simulated production of a black hole in ATLAS. This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in late 2009/2010. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was created in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.
Photo #: 0803019_25
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Simulated production of a black hole in ATLAS. This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in late 2009/2010. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was created in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.
Photo #: 0803019_02
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Simulated production of a black hole in ATLAS. This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in late 2009/2010. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was created in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.
Photo #: 0803019_04
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Simulated production of a black hole in ATLAS. This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in late 2009/2010. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was created in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.
Photo #: 0803019_05
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Hi resolution
Simulated production of a black hole in ATLAS. This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in late 2009/2010. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was created in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.
Photo #: 0803019_06
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Hi resolution
Simulated production of a black hole in ATLAS. This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in late 2009/2010. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was created in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.
Photo #: 0803019_07
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Hi resolution
Simulated production of a black hole in ATLAS. This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in late 2009/2010. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was created in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.
Photo #: 0803019_09
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Hi resolution
Simulated production of a black hole in ATLAS. This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in late 2009/2010. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was created in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.
Photo #: 0803019_11
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Hi resolution
Simulated production of a black hole in ATLAS. This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in late 2009/2010. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was created in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.
Photo #: 0803019_12
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Hi resolution
Simulated production of a black hole in ATLAS. This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in late 2009/2010. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was created in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.
Photo #: 0803019_13
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Lo resolution

 

Hi resolution
Simulated production of a black hole in ATLAS. This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in late 2009/2010. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was created in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.
Photo #: 0803019_15
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Hi resolution
Simulated production of a black hole in ATLAS. This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in late 2009/2010. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was created in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.
Photo #: 0803019_16
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Hi resolution
Simulated production of a black hole in ATLAS. This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in late 2009/2010. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was created in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.
Photo #: 0803019_18
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Hi resolution
Simulated production of a black hole in ATLAS. This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in late 2009/2010. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was created in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.
Photo #: 0803019_20
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Hi resolution
Simulated production of a black hole in ATLAS. This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in late 2009/2010. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was created in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.
Photo #: 0803019_21
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Hi resolution
Simulated production of a black hole in ATLAS. This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in late 2009/2010. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was created in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.
Photo #: 0803019_22
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Lo resolution

 

Hi resolution
Simulated production of a black hole in ATLAS. This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in late 2009/2010. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was created in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.
Photo #: 0803019_23
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Lo resolution

 

Hi resolution
Simulated production of a black hole in ATLAS. This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in late 2009/2010. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was created in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.
Photo #: 0803019_26
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Lo resolution

 

Hi resolution
Simulated production of a black hole in ATLAS. This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in late 2009/2010. These tracks would be produced if a miniature black hole was created in the proton-proton collision. Such a small black hole would decay instantly to various particles via a process known as Hawking radiation.
Photo #: 0803019_24
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Hi resolution
Sideview event pictures. A simulated collision event viewed from the side (beam is horizontal in center). The event is one in which a microscopic-blackhole was produced and decayed immediately. The black area in the center with many particle tracks represents the inner detector (pixel detector, semiconductor tracker, and transition radiation tracker), which has been enormously magnified relative to the rest of the detector (in this view) . The colors of the thin tracks have no significance. The thick yellow lines are the two electrons in this event. The green area is the electromagnetic calorimeter, while the red area is the hadronic calorimeter. The green and red histograms show the energy deposits by particles in the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters. A muon was added by hand to the event to show how it would look in the detector; it is a thick blue line in the inner detector and orange in the (blue) muon chambers.
Photo #: 001_001_001.jpg
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Hi resolution
ATLAS collision event. In some theories, microscopic black holes may be produced in particle collisions that occur when very-high-energy cosmic rays hit particles in our atmosphere. These microscopic-black-holes would decay into ordinary particles in a tiny fraction of a second and would be very difficult to observe in our atmosphere.
The ATLAS Experiment offers the exciting possibility to study them in the lab (if they exist). The simulated collision event shown is viewed along the beampipe. The event is one in which a microscopic-black-hole was produced in the collision of two protons (not shown). The microscopic-black-hole decayed immediately into many particles. The colors of the tracks show different types of particles emerging from the collision (at the center).
Photo #: 0803021_01
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Hi resolution
ATLAS collision event. In some theories, microscopic black holes may be produced in particle collisions that occur when very-high-energy cosmic rays hit particles in our atmosphere. These microscopic-black-holes would decay into ordinary particles in a tiny fraction of a second and would be very difficult to observe in our atmosphere.
The ATLAS Experiment offers the exciting possibility to study them in the lab (if they exist). The simulated collision event shown is viewed along the beampipe. The event is one in which a microscopic-black-hole was produced in the collision of two protons (not shown). The microscopic-black-hole decayed immediately into many particles. The colors of the tracks show different types of particles emerging from the collision (at the center).
Photo #: 0803021_02
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Lo resolution

 

Hi resolution
Endview event picture. A simulated collision event viewed along the beampipe. The event is one in which a microscopic-blackhole was produced and decayed immediately. The black area in the center with many particle tracks represents the inner detector (pixel detector, semiconductor tracker, and transition radiation tracker), which has been enormously magnified relative to the rest of the detector (in this view) . The colors of the thin tracks have no significance. The thick yellow lines are the two electrons in this event. The green area is the electromagnetic calorimeter, while the red area is the hadronic calorimeter. The green and red histograms show the energy deposits by particles in the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters. A muon was added by hand to the event to show how it would look in the detector; it is a thick blue line in the inner detector and orange in the (blue) muon chambers.
Photo #: eve_gen_0101_001
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Hi resolution
ATLAS collision events. In some theories, microscopic black holes may be produced in particle collisions that occur when very-high-energy cosmic rays hit particles in our atmosphere. These microscopic-black-holes would decay into ordinary particles in a tiny fraction of a second and would be very difficult to observe in our atmosphere.
The ATLAS Experiment offers the exciting possibility to study them in the lab (if they exist). The simulated collision event shown is viewed along the beampipe. The event is one in which a microscopic-black-hole was produced in the collision of two protons (not shown). The microscopic-black-hole decayed immediately into many particles. The colors of the tracks show different types of particles emerging from the collision (at the center).
Photo #: blackhole_notext
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Hi resolution
ATLAS collision events. In some theories, microscopic black holes may be produced in particle collisions that occur when very-high-energy cosmic rays hit particles in our atmosphere. These microscopic-black-holes would decay into ordinary particles in a tiny fraction of a second and would be very difficult to observe in our atmosphere.
The ATLAS Experiment offers the exciting possibility to study them in the lab (if they exist). The simulated collision event shown is viewed along the beampipe. The event is one in which a microscopic-black-hole was produced in the collision of two protons (not shown). The microscopic-black-hole decayed immediately into many particles. The colors of the tracks show different types of particles emerging from the collision (at the center).
Photo #: blackhole_text
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Hi resolution
A new view of a black hole event. ATLAS collision events. In some theories, microscopic black holes may be produced in particle collisions that occur when very-high-energy cosmic rays hit particles in our atmosphere. These microscopic-black-holes would decay into ordinary particles in a tiny fraction of a second and would be very difficult to observe in our atmosphere.
The ATLAS Experiment offers the exciting possibility to study them in the lab (if they exist). The simulated collision event shown is viewed along the beampipe. The event is one in which a microscopic-black-hole was produced in the collision of two protons (not shown). The microscopic-black-hole decayed immediately into many particles. The colors of the tracks show different types of particles emerging from the collision (at the center).
Photo #: black-hole-event-wide
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Hi resolution
A new view of a black hole event. ATLAS collision events. In some theories, microscopic black holes may be produced in particle collisions that occur when very-high-energy cosmic rays hit particles in our atmosphere. These microscopic-black-holes would decay into ordinary particles in a tiny fraction of a second and would be very difficult to observe in our atmosphere.
The ATLAS Experiment offers the exciting possibility to study them in the lab (if they exist). The simulated collision event shown is viewed along the beampipe. The event is one in which a microscopic-black-hole was produced in the collision of two protons (not shown). The microscopic-black-hole decayed immediately into many particles. The colors of the tracks show different types of particles emerging from the collision (at the center).
Photo #: black-hole-event-square
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"Black Hole" event superimposed over a classic image of the ATLAS detector.
Photo #: detector-w-event-001